Sunnyside Upside Down

I usually come up with a chord progression or a riff for a new song first and then ad lib a melody with some random words over the top. Occasionally, I sing something into my phone while out walking the dog and then struggle to retro-fit the chords to my melody. This time, it wasn’t so hard…the chord sequence isn’t anything complicated – E – B – E – A – E – F#7 – B7 etc with two turnarounds E to C#7 to F#m back to A and one with an E to the B to A to Am. I assume that’s fairly standard stuff.

The words were originally based around the phrase “born with my brightside upside down, but then inspiration struck, sunnyside down…hence the fried egg for the graphic. It’s kind of a gospel song, but it’s not religious…if that’s not a contradiction in terms. Gospel, comes from the original “god spell” meaning “good story”…

sunnyside-upside-down
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via Dave Bradley Music http://j.mp/1qJcdpy

Facebook breaks Opera

ClassicFM is reporting that Opera Australia soprano Tamar Iveri has been “released from her contract” following a storm that erupted when homophobic remarks appeared on her Facebook page. The singer says the original message, posted 18 months ago, was written by her husband who was using her account at the time…

Well, whatever the story, the outcome should serve as a warning to everyone who uses social media (which is almost everyone these days). No matter how much you trust your significant other, members of your family or your friends, there might come a time when one or more of you is/are (a) seriously intoxicated (b) seriously annoyed (c) seriously messing about (or any combination of those three) and at least one person is logged in at the time…and someone thinks it’s a good idea to post something on someone else’s behalf.

Stay safe: keep your passwords to yourself and make sure you’re logged out when you’re not in physical possession of your smartphone, laptop, tablet etc…just saying.

Opera Australia sacks soprano after homophobic rant.

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via Dave Bradley Music http://j.mp/1r4tL1C

It Bites loses its teeth…RAM

Earlier this month, 80s pop progsters “It Bites” were, according to their Facebook page, forced to withdraw from what may well have been the biggest gig of their careers – the Holmfirth Prog Splash in West Yorkshire. Donnington had fast cars and metal, Holmfirth had Last of the Summer Wine and prog. Niiice.

The genre-defying band (think Tears for Fears does Marillion), apologising to fans, cited technical issues and a memory card malfunction. Apparently, keyboard player John Beck’s entire 30 years of music programming for the band has been lost. It was a disaster. Fellow keyboard player Dan Parratt explained in the comments that the card in question was in storage and it was an ancient volatile battery backed-up RAM card. “The battery simply expired whilst the keyboard was in storage, as John only uses it for iB – and did not work in his keyboard or my identical one.” He added that, “Once the battery expires, there is no way of recovering the data as it’s not flash memory nor magnetic hard disk type memory.”

Sad news for keyboard player and fans of the band, famous for their second single, the June 1986 hit “Calling all the Heroes” with its Marillion style proggy artwork. “It’s going to take an extreme effort for John to reprogram all this, and only he can do it, as I’m sure all keyboard players will agree, we all do things our own way,” said Parratt. Here’s their big hit, you can hear where Everything Everything and various other modern pop progsters may well have got their first inkling of musical possibilities.

The moral of the tale? Well, backup, backup, backup again. Of course, with archaic and obsolete technology that may well not be possible. There are probably lots of relic keyboards and early digitial cameras etc that take steam-driven memory cards from back in the day. Best to extract the data in a format that will work with the current equipment if you can, back that up, back it up again. Keep your digital art current in terms of the tech. Everything I had backed up on floppy discs and then zip drives went on to CDs, and then DVDs and USB sticks and USB hard drives. I also keep a copy of everything in the vast chambers of my laptop’s solid state drive. You know it makes sense. If you don’t backup, it’ll come back to bite you…

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via Dave Bradley Music http://j.mp/1qJcb10

It Bites loses its teeth…RAM

Earlier this month, 80s pop progsters “It Bites” were, according to their Facebook page, forced to withdraw from what may well have been the biggest gig of their careers – the Holmfirth Prog Splash in West Yorkshire. Donnington had fast cars and metal, Holmfirth had Last of the Summer Wine and prog. Niiice.

The genre-defying band (think Tears for Fears does Marillion), apologising to fans, cited technical issues and a memory card malfunction. Apparently, keyboard player John Beck’s entire 30 years of music programming for the band has been lost. It was a disaster. Fellow keyboard player Dan Parratt explained in the comments that the card in question was in storage and it was an ancient volatile battery backed-up RAM card. “The battery simply expired whilst the keyboard was in storage, as John only uses it for iB – and did not work in his keyboard or my identical one.” He added that, “Once the battery expires, there is no way of recovering the data as it’s not flash memory nor magnetic hard disk type memory.”

Sad news for keyboard player and fans of the band, famous for their second single, the June 1986 hit “Calling all the Heroes” with its Marillion style proggy artwork. “It’s going to take an extreme effort for John to reprogram all this, and only he can do it, as I’m sure all keyboard players will agree, we all do things our own way,” said Parratt. Here’s their big hit, you can hear where Everything Everything and various other modern pop progsters may well have got their first inkling of musical possibilities.

The moral of the tale? Well, backup, backup, backup again. Of course, with archaic and obsolete technology that may well not be possible. There are probably lots of relic keyboards and early digitial cameras etc that take steam-driven memory cards from back in the day. Best to extract the data in a format that will work with the current equipment if you can, back that up, back it up again. Keep your digital art current in terms of the tech. Everything I had backed up on floppy discs and then zip drives went on to CDs, and then DVDs and USB sticks and USB hard drives. I also keep a copy of everything in the vast chambers of my laptop’s solid state drive. You know it makes sense. If you don’t backup, it’ll come back to bite you…

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via Dave Bradley Music http://j.mp/1qJcb10

Grow crops from open-source seed

The three bullet points:

  • Many poor farmers use low-quality local seed rather than expensive patented ones
  • The Open Source Seed Initiative is offering 36 types of 14 food crops
  • All seed packets contain a pledge stating that the seed can be used freely

‘Open-source’ seed released to nurture patent-free food – SciDev.Net.

Grow crops from open-source seed is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom

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via Sciencebase – Science, Snaps, Songs http://j.mp/1q87MH6